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title-key-takeaways

Northeastern

As in most of the United States, the percentage of naturalized citizens to noncitizens in each state is divided roughly in half, though those who are naturalized generally make up the majority by a few percentage points. The percentage of foreign-born citizens in this part of the country varies from just four percent in Maine to nearly a quarter of the population in New York.

  • New York State has the highest percentage of foreign-born residents in the northeastern United States, with these individuals accounting for 23 percent of the population.
  • Vermont has the greatest percentage of naturalized citizens compared to noncitizens in the northeastern US.
  • Delaware is the only state in the northeastern part of the country where more than half of the immigrants are noncitizens.

Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont

Southern

Naturalized citizens account for more than half of immigrants only in Florida and Virginia. In much of the southern United States, less than 40 percent of immigrants are naturalized citizens. However, the percentage of foreign-born residents is much smaller for most of this region as well.

  • One in five Florida residents are foreign-born, and 55 percent of immigrants in the state are naturalized.
  • In Arkansas, only 32 percent of immigrants are naturalized citizens. This is the smallest percentage of naturalized immigrants in the southern US.
  • Just two percent of residents are foreign-born in Mississippi, and only 1.7 percent are foreign-born in West Virginia.

Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas

Midwestern

The Midwest presents a varied picture of immigration, from Illinois where naturalized citizens and noncitizens are split nearly 50/50 to South Dakota, Nebraska, and Iowa where less than 40 percent of the population is naturalized. Foreign-born residents account for anywhere from 3 to 14 percent of the population in these states.

  • Illinois has the highest percentage of foreign-born residents in the Midwest, with these individuals accounting for nearly 14 percent of the population.
  • North Dakota and South Dakota have the smallest percentages of foreign-born residents in the Midwest, with these accounting for less than four percent of the population in each state.
  • In Nebraska, just 34 percent of immigrants are naturalized. This is the smallest percentage in the Midwest.

North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio

Western

In the western United States, the state of immigration varies dramatically from the southern part of the country to the north. In California, over a quarter of all residents are foreign-born, yet this is true of just 2.1 percent of the population in Montana. This part of the United States is wildly diverse, having conditions on both ends of the spectrum.

  • California has the highest percentage of foreign-born residents in the country, with more then 27 percent of the population falling into this category.
  • The percentage of naturalized citizens compared to noncitizens is particularly low in Idaho, Wyoming, and Utah, where these account for less than 40 percent of immigrants.
  • Fifty-seven percent of immigrants in Hawaii and Alaska are naturalized citizens, which is the highest percentage in the Western United States.

Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, Nevada, Washington, Oregon, California, Alaska, Hawaii

**Map data is provided from DHS.gov and Migrationpolicy.org