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Corporate Relocation: Availability of Quality Elder Care
Corporate Relocation: Availability of Quality Elder Care. When you undertake a corporate relocation, there’s a good chance your employer has moving packages and information available to help get your spouse and children settled in. Area schools for the kids, spousal job placement to help your significant other find employment, and even support groups exist to help everyone feel good about the upcoming move.

Corporate-Relocation-Elder-CareWhen you undertake a corporate relocation, there’s a good chance your employer has moving packages and information available to help get your spouse and children settled in. Area schools for the kids, spousal job placement to help your significant other find employment, and even support groups exist to help everyone feel good about the upcoming move.

However, for many families, there are also elderly parents to consider. If you have a parent who lives with you or who plans on making the move so they can stay close, you may want to look at the availability of quality elder care in your new community.

Types of Elder Care

Elder care can take on a variety of forms, including at-home nursing options, part-time in-home care, retirement communities, assisted living facilities, and nursing homes—the choice of which depends on your situation and the type of care your parent requires.

Before you agree to relocate or make a move, take some time to investigate the options in the city you’ll be moving to. This may mean visiting facilities to see for yourself what the setting and features are. Larger cities tend to have more choices when it comes to elder care, but you’ll often find price tags to match. Smaller cities might not have as many facilities, but they often have great community rec centers and inexpensive homes where your parent could have an in-law suite of their own.

Making the Right Choice

Here are a few important steps you can take in your transition to a new city with an elderly parent.

> Talk to Your Parent: You may be surprised to find that your relative has a few opinions of their own regarding this upcoming move. Ask them about what they want from this relocation before you start making concrete plans. It may turn out that they’d rather stay where they are and let you do the moving on your own.

> Look at the Finances: Elder care almost always comes with a high price tag, so it’s important to budget accordingly. Ask facilities about their rates and the types of insurance they accept so you can make a more informed choice.

> Ask Your Employer: Just as your employer may be willing to increase your income based on differences in cost of living, so too might they compensate you for the change to/from a nursing home or care facility for your elderly relative. You’ll never know what they might offer if you don’t ask.

> Plan for Visits: Never agree to an elderly care facility without first visiting the grounds and seeing for yourself what to expect. This is also your chance to ask questions and plan for how much furniture you’ll need to move.

> Do Your Research: No two elder care plans are created equally. Do your research by looking at things like the Better Business Bureau, reading online reviews, talking to hospitals and doctors in the new city, and getting to know the families of other elderly residents.

Above all else, be open and honest with everyone involved in the move—including your employer. Support may come from unexpected places, and the less time you spend worrying about the quality of care, the more time you can dedicate to your new job.

Are you an employee who is relocating with a lump sum benefit? Contact our moving experts now and get started.
Are you an employee who is relocating with a lump sum benefit? Contact our moving experts now and get started.