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Corporate Relocation Mistakes

by Ryan Cox on Jun 14, 2016
While a relocating for your job represents an opportunity to move up at work or have a better living situation, it can also be stressful and frustrating. Get tips on how to anticipate and prevent common relocation mistakes.

Corporate-Relocation-SchoolsFor many families, a corporate relocation represents an opportunity to move up in the world. Most of the time, we undergo this kind of change because it offers more money, a better living situation, a chance to start over in a new place, or even a way to experience more of what the world has to offer.

While it’s fantastic that you’re excited about this new transition in your life, uprooting your family and settling in a new place can also be frustrating and stressful. To get the most out of your move, these are the most common corporate relocation mistakes to avoid.

Overestimating Your Enthusiasm: Most of the time, moving to a new place is exciting. There will be new things to see and do, new people to meet, new experiences to try…all good things, right? While it’s good to be enthusiastic about your upcoming change, you also need to be realistic. Don’t just focus on all the things you’ll be gaining—also look at the things you’ll be losing. Leaving friends and family, a community you love, and a job you’re comfortable with might be harder than you think.

Not Getting Your Family On Board: One thing that remains true for most moves—if one person is unhappy about it, the whole family is likely to suffer. Although you can’t shape your entire future around a surly teenager, you should sit down with your family and make sure everyone knows the pros, cons, and what to expect out of the experience.

>Ignoring Longer Commute Times: If you’re relocating from a small city to a larger one, you might not take into account the adaptation required for things like transportation. Saying to yourself, “Okay, a thirty minute drive to and from work isn’t bad, and the kids can do their homework on the bus” is one thing. Actually living that experience every day is another. Be prepared for how things like transportation, access to shops and stores, and proximity to city features will affect your quality of life overall.


Failing to Adjust Cost of Living: More money is great, but it won’t mean much if the city you’re relocating to is an incredibly expensive place to live. Before you sign on for a relocation, make sure you adjust your finances for the new city. If 70 percent of your income is going to have to go to real estate, the increase in pay might actually end up

> Doing the Move on Your Own: Transitioning to a new job and a new city is difficult enough; the last thing you need is to spend the first few months slowly unpacking boxes and wondering when life will start to feel normal again. Although it might cost more to have professionals move you in, it will be well worth the investment when you can come home to a house that’s clean and moved in and ready for you to make your mark.

Relocation is likely to have its ups and downs, and no one is ever 100 percent happy about a move all of the time. Although you may experience regrets and setbacks, planning ahead and going into your move with your eyes open can help keep those to a minimum. 

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