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Ask Allied: How Should I Pack Fragile Items?

by Jackie Heath on Jul 10, 2015
Ask Allied: How Should I Pack Fragile Items? If you’re like most families, your biggest concern as you begin the task of packing up your home is how to keep your most fragile items from breaking. Kitchen plates and stemware, expensive electronics, artwork you want to keep in good repair…we’ve all heard stories of these things crumbling to pieces during a move. However, with the right planning and tools, you can keep your breakables intact and in good repair.

Ask-Allied-Packing-Fragile-ItemsIf you’re like most families, your biggest concern as you begin the task of packing up your home is how to keep your most fragile items from breaking. Kitchen plates and stemware, expensive electronics, artwork you want to keep in good repair…we’ve all heard stories of these things crumbling to pieces during a move. However, with the right planning and tools, you can keep your breakables intact and in good repair.

Packing Supplies to Buy

Many people make do with newspaper, old towels, blankets, and other items around the house to wrap fragile items. While you can do this, it isn’t recommended. Newspapers often leave prints on glass and ceramics, and towels and blankets can easily slip off. In order to best secure your items, you’ll need:

> Bubble Wrap
> Packing Paper
> Packing Peanuts (or other foam filler)
> Tape
> Scissors
> Marker

You’ll also want to look for specialty boxes that are designed for fragile items. Kitchen plates and glasses, for example, can be compartmentalized to keep them from hitting each other in transit.

Fragile Item Packing Tips

> The biggest damage to breakables comes from two of them colliding with one another, so your job is to provide a barrier between each one. Packing paper and bubble wrap are ideal for this, especially if you take the time to secure the wrapping with tape.

> When packing a box, always put heavier items on the bottom and make sure the boxes are marked This Side Up so you don’t accidentally tip it over and crush the breakables on top.

> Although stuffing a box full of packing peanuts or another filler is a great way to keep things from rattling around, don’t overfill the box with actual items. Too many items in there and it will not only be too heavy, but potentially more likely to break.

> When packing a flat fragile item (like a mirror, glass frame, or television screen), apply masking tape in a cross shape that covers the entire surface. This way, even if it does break, the pieces will stay in place.

> Flat pieces of cardboard (that you purchase or cut from boxes) can help add an extra layer of protection. They can be inserted between breakable items or cut to add an “inner box” around fragile items. You can also shape your own box around odd-shaped pieces this way.

> Labels are your friend when packing breakables. Knowing what you’re handling will save you a lot of time opening and closing boxes (and will help tell the movers what to be careful of when moving).

> For especially valuable items, consider doing the moving yourself. You might feel better know your wedding china is close at hand and that you can check in on it anytime you want.

Another choice is to let the moving company handle the packing for you. If you aren’t sure which boxes to buy for each kind of item, or if the idea of individually wrapping every plate in your kitchen is too much, you can simply including packing services as part of your move. We’ll handle the packing and securing, and you can rest easy knowing your valuables are taken care of.

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